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clinical trial
if you have
Spinal Cord Vascular Diseases
and you are
-
The phase for this study is not defined.
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The purpose

Spinal arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are complex neurosurgical lesions that are very challenging to manage. Spinal vascular malformations account for 3%-4% of all intradural spinal cord mass lesions. Over the last few decades our understanding of these lesions has dramatically increased thanks to neuroimaging technology (e.g. spinal angiography and indocyanine green angiography). Various treatment modalities including conservative observation, endovascular embolization, microsurgical resection, radiation therapy, and combined therapies have been reported. The treatment for these AVMs and AVFs depends on their location, the type of malformation, the area of the spine involved, and the condition of the patient at the time of treatment. Due to the rarity of these spinal vascular lesions, reports of their management and outcomes have been limited to small series and case reports. And the rates of obliteration and outcomes are not satisfactory, especially the spinal AVMs. Spinal vascular lesions are rare but represent a formidable challenge for the treating neurosurgeon.The purpose of this study is to establish multimodality treatment mode and evaluate the anatomical cure rate and functional preservation rate.
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Tris trial is registered with FDA with number: NCT03024749. The sponsor of the trial is Hongqi Zhang, MD and it is looking for 380 volunteers for the current phase.
Official trial title:
Surgical Intervention of Spinal Arteriovenous Malformations and Fistulas: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study