Your journey
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More info
You can access this
clinical trial
if you have
Spinal Cord Injury
and you are
over 18
years old
-
This is an observational trial.
You are contributing to medical knowledge about your condition.
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The purpose

Changes in the GI microbiota and/or metabolomics have been linked to evolving transformations in immune system function and infection rates in experimental SCI in animal models. A recent study involving chronic survivors of SCI show distinct GI microbiome changes in comparison to healthy controls. GI microbial metabolism of dietary components has been causally linked to various health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, infections, which is an ongoing concern for chronic SCI survivors. It is probable that alterations of GI microbiota are established acutely after SCI and could subsequently alter medical care and impact health outcomes for people living with SCI. This project is a pilot study to describe any changes in the GI and urinary tract microbiota as they appear over the first year after SCI. When available, data on factors, other than SCI, that may impact change in the gut microbiome after SCI will also be noted, including: - the level and severity of SCI, - the time since SCI, - the person's immune profile, - the antibiotic regimen of the individual and time since antibiotic administration, - the incidence and type of infections after SCI and - the person's diet or activities after SCI
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Locations near you

Unfortunately, there are no recruiting locations near you. Please check the list with all locations below.
Tris trial is registered with FDA with number: NCT02903472. The sponsor of the trial is University of British Columbia and it is looking for 52 volunteers for the current phase.
Official trial title:
Gastrointestinal (GI) and Urinary Tract (UT) Microbiome (MICRO) After Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)