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Your journey
1What's a trial
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3Review
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More info
You can access this
clinical trial
if you have
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases, Chronic Airways Limitation or Bronchitis
and you are
between 40 and 80
years old
3
This is a trial in the final phase before the treatment is released on the market.
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The purpose

Some patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) have large number of specific white blood cells called eosinophils in their airways. These cells are also responsible for causing episodes of worsened respiratory symptoms (exacerbations) and often cause irreversible damage to the airways . This subset of COPD patients often require oral steroids to bring down the number of eosinophils in their airways. Steroids have harmful effects on several of our body systems like bones, blood pressure, blood glucose control and can cause recurrent infections. Mepolizumab is a drug that specifically targets eosinophils reducing the number in the airway. This drug has been shown to be effective in decreasing exacerbation rates and time to exacerbation in asthma patients with eosinophils in their airways. Targeting eosinophils in COPD patients has been shown to reduce severe exacerbations. Hence it is likely that COPD patients with eosinophils in their airways will benefit similarly and have reduced rates and time to exacerbation. Study Hypothesis:Does mepolizumab decrease sputum eosinophils in patients with fixed airflow obstruction (COPD) and eosinophilic bronchitis?

Provided treatments

  • Drug: Mepolizumab
  • Drug: placebo

Locations near you

Unfortunately, there are no recruiting locations near you. Please check the list with all locations below.
Tris trial is registered with FDA with number: NCT01463644. The sponsor of the trial is McMaster University and it is looking for 19 volunteers for the current phase.
Official trial title:
Mepolizumab in COPD With Eosinophilic Bronchitis: A Randomized Clinical Trial