This trial is enrolling by invitation!
Search for a recruiting clinical trial for your condition
Your journey
1What's a trial
2Find
3Review
4Get in touch
More info
You can access this
clinical trial
if you have
Diabetes or Cardiovascular Disease
and you are
over 18
years old
-
This is an observational trial.
You are contributing to medical knowledge about your condition.
Show me locations

The purpose

Background: - African Americans have one of the highest rates of type 2 diabetes in the United States, and often have other medical problems related to obesity and cardiovascular disease. These conditions have various risk factors, including high blood sugar levels, high cholesterol levels, and insulin resistance. However, these risk factors have not been studied very closely in individuals with African ancestry, including Afro-Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa migrant populations. Researchers are interested in conducting a genetic study on obesity, adult-onset diabetes, heart disease, and other common health conditions in individuals with African ancestry. Objectives: - To collect genetic and non-genetic information from individuals with African ancestry to study common health conditions related to obesity, adult-onset diabetes, and heart disease. Eligibility: - Individuals at least 18 years of age who self-identify as African American, Afro-Caribbean, or migrants from sub Saharan Africa. Design: - Participants will undergo a physical examination and will provide a blood sample for study. - Participants will also answer questions about personal and family medical history and current lifestyle behaviors. - No treatment will be provided as part of this protocol.

Locations near you

Unfortunately, there are no recruiting locations near you. Please check the list with all locations below.
Tris trial is registered with FDA with number: NCT01316783. The sponsor of the trial is National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and it is looking for 533 volunteers for the current phase.
Official trial title:
Genetics of Obesity, Diabetes, and Heart Disease in African Diaspora Populations