This trial is terminated!
Search for a recruiting clinical trial for your condition
Your journey
1What's a trial
2Find
3Review
4Get in touch
More info
You can access this
clinical trial
if you have
Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer
and you are
over 18
years old
2
This is a second phase trial assessing
efficacy and side effects of the new treatment.
Show me locations

The purpose

Background: - Pioglitazone is a drug that belongs to the class of antidiabetic agents called thiazolidinediones. It is approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. - Research suggests that the thiazolidinediones may have anticancer activity that can reduce cancer risk or cause tumors to shrink. Objectives: -To test how a pioglitazone works as a treatment of Stage IA to IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and to look at the effect of the drug on cancer cells. Eligibility: -Patients 18 years of age or older who will undergo surgery for Stage IA to IIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Design: -The study includes a screening visit to determine eligibility, treatment with pioglitazone, a follow-up visit after 2 to 3 weeks of treatment and a post-surgery visit. Procedures include: 1. Medical history, physical examination, blood tests, electrocardiogram 2. Bronchoscopy to obtain cancer cells. This is done before pioglitazone treatment begins and again during lung surgery. Some patients may also require mediastinoscopy or biopsy to collect cells. 3. Treatment with pioglitazone tablets once a day for at least 2 weeks and no more than 6 weeks, depending on when surgery has been scheduled. 4. Positron emission tomography (PET) scan before starting pioglitazone treatment. National Cancer Institute (NCI) patients also have a follow-up PET scan after treatment but before surgery.

Provided treatments

  • Drug: Pioglitazone
Tris trial is registered with FDA with number: NCT00923949. The sponsor of the trial is National Cancer Institute (NCI) and it is looking for 1 volunteers for the current phase.
Official trial title:
Pilot Trial of Pioglitazone in Adults Undergoing Surgical Resection of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer