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HIFLO ENDO- Use of High Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygenation to Increase Patient Safety During Upper GI Endoscopy (NCT03028688)

Millions of patients undergo upper GI endoscopy in the United States each year. A large number of these patients have anesthesia to assist with their comfort during the procedure. The majority of patients do not have a protected airway during the procedure, meaning there is no endotracheal tube. Instead the current standard of care is to give supplementary oxygen via nasal cannula. Because patients are deeply sedated or have general anesthesia there is a risk for low oxygen saturation during the procedure, which presents a significant patient safety issue. The purpose of the clinical trial is compare the current anesthesia standard of care against high flow nasal cannula oxygen delivery during anesthesia. The investigator's hypothesis is that high flow nasal cannula oxygen delivery will decrease the frequency with which patients experience hypoxemia during anesthesia for upper GI endoscopy.
  • Device: High flow nasal cannula oxygen
    Participants will receive high flow nasal cannula oxygen delivery during anesthesia. Participants will also have transcutaneous PCO2 measurements performed using a cutaneous electrode.
    Ages eligible for Study
    18 Years and older
    Genders eligible for Study
    All
    Accepts Healthy Volunteers
    Accepts Healthy Volunteers
    Inclusion Criteria:
    • Having Upper GI endoscopy expected to last greater than 15 minutes with anesthesia.
    • Age greater than or equal to 18 years
    Exclusion Criteria:
    • Propofol, midazolam, or fentanyl allergy
    • Pre-procedure plan for general anesthesia with an endotracheal tube (at the discretion of the attending anesthesiologist)
    • Any procedure with planned electro-cautery as a high-inspired oxygen concentration could increase the risk for airway or esophageal fire.
    Status:
    not yet recruiting
    Type:
    Interventional
    Phase:
    -
    Start:
    31 May, 2017
    Updated:
    30 April, 2017
    Participants:
    262
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