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Post-operative Urinary Retention: A Prospective Randomized Study Identifying Patients at Risk and Reducing the Incidence Using Tamsulosin Pretreatment (NCT03027115)

Investigating whether pre-operative treatment with a selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist affects the likelihood of male patients developing post-operative urinary retention following hernia repair.
  • Drug: Tamsulosin
    Tamsulosin treatment for 7 days pre-operatively
    • Flomax
Ages eligible for Study
18 Years and older
Genders eligible for Study
Male
Accepts Healthy Volunteers
No
Inclusion Criteria:
  • Male
  • 18 years of age
  • Presenting with hernia requiring surgical intervention
Exclusion Criteria:
  • Intolerability of tamsulosin or related drugs
  • Investigator discretion
  • Unwillingness or inability to comply with protocol procedures and assessments
The purpose of this study will be to investigate whether pre-operative treatment with a selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist affects the likelihood of male patients developing post-operative urinary retention following hernia repair surgery. It is also of interest to determine whether or not a well-known urological screening tool, the IPSS, can identify patients at risk for urinary retention following elective laparoscopic or open hernia repair surgery. We will investigate if it is possible to pre-treat patients with a selective alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist which we think can reduce the incidence of post-operative urinary retention and the associated adverse consequences, especially in those patients at higher risk.

1 locations

United States (1)
  • Memorial Health University Medical Center
    recruiting
    Savannah, Georgia, United States, 31404
Status:
recruiting
Type:
Interventional
Phase:
Start:
12 January, 2017
Updated:
14 May, 2017
Participants:
140
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